Home About us Contact us Archives Advanced Search
Home » Macroeconomic Policy

Sections

Macroeconomic Policy

C.P. Chandrasekhar, Jayati Ghosh
Tuesday 07 June, 2016
As interested observers focus on the bad loans, accumulating in the books of India’s commercial banks, the implications it has for lending behaviour and growth are less explored.
Prabhat Patnaik
Thursday 21 April, 2016
Even the unconventional measure of charging negative interest rates, as the author says, is unlikely to end the recession because capitalism today is in a deep structural crisis.
C.P. Chandrasekhar, Jayati Ghosh
Tuesday 15 March, 2016
With interest rates and bond yields turning negative in many developed countries, the efficacy of monetary policy as a countercyclical instrument is in question.
Julio Lopez Gallardo, Roberto Valencia Arriaga
Tuesday 03 November, 2015
The authors argue that the key variable to achieve inflation control is the exchange rate and not the interest rate, although the latter indirectly affects the price level and output.
C.P. Chandrasekhar
Wednesday 14 October, 2015
The recent rate cut by the RBI reflects a shift in its policy stance and signals that it has accepted that the biggest threat in India today is not inflation, but deflation.
Andrew Cornford
Monday 31 August, 2015
The author here illustrates the fact that in the reports prepared by FSB less attention is given to typical problems of design and implementation in developing than in developed countries.
Prabhat Patnaik
Tuesday 07 July, 2015
The world economy today is reminiscent of the 1930s where competitive easing of monetary policy is not boosting aggregate demand and fiscal policy is barred by finance capital.
C.P. Chandrasekhar
Thursday 05 February, 2015
The distribution of rural credit disbursement is skewed and biased towards the rich and warrants better access to all sections for improved capital formation in agriculture.
C.P. Chandrasekhar, Jayati Ghosh
Tuesday 25 November, 2014
Amidst stock market euphoria, the growing international debt exposure of certain Asian countries, particularly Hong Kong, China and India, is a matter of major concern.
C.P. Chandrasekhar
Thursday 13 November, 2014
Instead of resorting to measures like incentivising NRI deposits, Indian central bank and government will do better by introducing capital control to insulate the economy.
 

Sections

Themes

Quick Links